As CT considers legalizing recreational marijuana, Old Saybrook weighs local regulationsPosted by On


OLD SAYBROOK — As state lawmakers take a hard look at legalizing recreational marijuana, local officials are starting to prepare how to regulate its sale and use in town.

“If it’s going to be legalized, we have to try and protect the kids,” said Mike Rafferty, chairman of the Youth & Family Services Commission.

During this week’s Board of Selectman meeting, selectmen and Youth and Family Services officials discussed ways the town could regulate and control where and how marijuana is sold in Old Saybrook — if it becomes legal for recreational use.


Youth and Family Services Director Heather McNeil said youth prevention specialists are concerned about how marijuana use impacts brain and lung development in people under 25. She said local municipalities can restrict where businesses can grow, store, transport and sell marijuana and its products.

“You can also put constraints on products and potency, and things that can influence the impact this can have on the community,” she said.

First Selectman Carl Fortuna said he believes the proposed bill, which elected officials admit remains “a work in progress,” will likely become law.

McNeil’s presentation to the board focused primarily on the ways the town could curtail marijuana commercialization in Old Saybrook. She also spoke to regulating retail sales,…

Original Author Link click here to read complete story..

OLD SAYBROOK — As state lawmakers take a hard look at legalizing recreational marijuana, local officials are starting to prepare how to regulate its sale and use in town.

“If it’s going to be legalized, we have to try and protect the kids,” said Mike Rafferty, chairman of the Youth & Family Services Commission.

During this week’s Board of Selectman meeting, selectmen and Youth and Family Services officials discussed ways the town could regulate and control where and how marijuana is sold in Old Saybrook — if it becomes legal for recreational use.


Youth and Family Services Director Heather McNeil said youth prevention specialists are concerned about how marijuana use impacts brain and lung development in people under 25. She said local municipalities can restrict where businesses can grow, store, transport and sell marijuana and its products.

“You can also put constraints on products and potency, and things that can influence the impact this can have on the community,” she said.

First Selectman Carl Fortuna said he believes the proposed bill, which elected officials admit remains “a work in progress,” will likely become law.

McNeil’s presentation to the board focused primarily on the ways the town could curtail marijuana commercialization in Old Saybrook. She also spoke to regulating retail sales,…



Source link

News

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.