Cannabis-derived drug reduces symptoms for local woman suffering chronic seizuresPosted by On


When 27-year-old Bellevue woman Kelley Fox was 8 months old, she was diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex.

The disorder (TSC) causes non-cancerous tumors to grow in the brain and on other vital organs, resulting in seizures and developmental challenges.

Kelley’s early life was challenging. Her seizures began when she was four weeks old, according to her mother, Leslie Fox. A doctor told her that TSC patients were likely to develop epilepsy and autism and that her life expectancy was 20-years.

Kelley Fox was seizing nearly all the time, and at one year of age, doctors told her mother that the seizures were inhibiting her brain development.

At age 12, her family had to make a difficult decision to allow her to have a surgery that would remove a large part of her brain and to disconnect other parts of the brain that were causing the seizures.

Fox’s mother remembers seeing her after that surgery and hearing her say “mommy, my head hurts,” one of the largest constructed sentences her daughter had ever said up to that point in her life.

Leslie Fox knew the surgery had a significant impact at that moment, and was hopeful about the things Kelley could do from then on.

After learning how to walk and crawl, Kelley Fox began to ride horseback and swim. However, she still struggled with intermittent seizures. Eventually, Kelley qualified for a clinical trial of the cannabis-derived drug Epidiolex, a drug intended to reduce…

Original Author Link click here to read complete story..

When 27-year-old Bellevue woman Kelley Fox was 8 months old, she was diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex.

The disorder (TSC) causes non-cancerous tumors to grow in the brain and on other vital organs, resulting in seizures and developmental challenges.

Kelley’s early life was challenging. Her seizures began when she was four weeks old, according to her mother, Leslie Fox. A doctor told her that TSC patients were likely to develop epilepsy and autism and that her life expectancy was 20-years.

Kelley Fox was seizing nearly all the time, and at one year of age, doctors told her mother that the seizures were inhibiting her brain development.

At age 12, her family had to make a difficult decision to allow her to have a surgery that would remove a large part of her brain and to disconnect other parts of the brain that were causing the seizures.

Fox’s mother remembers seeing her after that surgery and hearing her say “mommy, my head hurts,” one of the largest constructed sentences her daughter had ever said up to that point in her life.

Leslie Fox knew the surgery had a significant impact at that moment, and was hopeful about the things Kelley could do from then on.

After learning how to walk and crawl, Kelley Fox began to ride horseback and swim. However, she still struggled with intermittent seizures. Eventually, Kelley qualified for a clinical trial of the cannabis-derived drug Epidiolex, a drug intended to reduce…



Source link

News

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.