City Council rejects latest marijuana petition, but it’s still headed for Aug. 3 ballotPosted by On

Rolling paper with cannabis

Michael Woodyard, attorney for Progress for Michigan 2020, takes questions from Port Huron City Council members at a meeting on Monday, May 10, 2021, at the Municipal Office Center.

Another marijuana ballot proposal is set to go before Port Huron voters on Aug. 3 — this time asking them to change a measure the majority already approved last November.

It’s just the latest step in a months-long process to award licenses for recreational and medical marijuana businesses after City Council members rejected a second petition initiative from Progress for Michigan 2020 at a meeting on Monday.

The group’s representatives have alleged the latest proposal to change its original ordinance is to put a bigger emphasis on medical marijuana licensure and prevent future lawsuits against the city.

“If that was your proposal, why is it that you don’t like it now?” Mayor Pro Tem Sherry Archibald said Monday, posing a question for Michael Woodyard, an attorney for Progress for Michigan, about the group’s first measure.

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Michael Woodyard, attorney for Progress for Michigan 2020, takes questions from Port Huron City Council members at a meeting on Monday, May 10, 2021, at the Municipal Office Center.

Another marijuana ballot proposal is set to go before Port Huron voters on Aug. 3 — this time asking them to change a measure the majority already approved last November.

It’s just the latest step in a months-long process to award licenses for recreational and medical marijuana businesses after City Council members rejected a second petition initiative from Progress for Michigan 2020 at a meeting on Monday.

The group’s representatives have alleged the latest proposal to change its original ordinance is to put a bigger emphasis on medical marijuana licensure and prevent future lawsuits against the city.

“If that was your proposal, why is it that you don’t like it now?” Mayor Pro Tem Sherry Archibald said Monday, posing a question for Michael Woodyard, an attorney for Progress for Michigan, about the group’s first measure.



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