Georgia Senate race shadows Trump’s loss, stimulus dealPosted by On


Within moments of flipping a thumbs-up in support of the coronavirus stimulus package on the Senate floor Monday night, Sen. David Perdue was surrounded by the chamber’s top three Republican leaders.

The four men, huddled in masks for 15 minutes, share an objective: getting Perdue and fellow Georgia Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler through intense runoff races in two weeks in order to win control of the Senate. And their hope is that Monday night’s vote — to send billions of dollars in coronavirus aid to Georgians and other Americans — will help them do it.

Washington Republicans and Democrats have kept the Georgia Senate races front of mind, calculating how their moves would help or hurt their candidates. Though the state is traditionally conservative, voters last month narrowly supported a Democrat for president — for the first time since 1992.

The race is so close that both parties have shied away from certain topics, hoping to both sway voters and avoid turning them off. Moderate Democrats worried a vote to legalize marijuana would paint Democrats as radicals. (The House voted on it anyway.) President-elect Joe Biden warned civil rights leaders that pressure about police reform could hurt the Democrats, according to audio of a call posted by the Intercept.

Republicans had their own concerns. Last week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told his…

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Within moments of flipping a thumbs-up in support of the coronavirus stimulus package on the Senate floor Monday night, Sen. David Perdue was surrounded by the chamber’s top three Republican leaders.

The four men, huddled in masks for 15 minutes, share an objective: getting Perdue and fellow Georgia Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler through intense runoff races in two weeks in order to win control of the Senate. And their hope is that Monday night’s vote — to send billions of dollars in coronavirus aid to Georgians and other Americans — will help them do it.

Washington Republicans and Democrats have kept the Georgia Senate races front of mind, calculating how their moves would help or hurt their candidates. Though the state is traditionally conservative, voters last month narrowly supported a Democrat for president — for the first time since 1992.

The race is so close that both parties have shied away from certain topics, hoping to both sway voters and avoid turning them off. Moderate Democrats worried a vote to legalize marijuana would paint Democrats as radicals. (The House voted on it anyway.) President-elect Joe Biden warned civil rights leaders that pressure about police reform could hurt the Democrats, according to audio of a call posted by the Intercept.

Republicans had their own concerns. Last week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told his…



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