Local Police Chief Voice Concerns on Marijuana LegalizationPosted by On

Spectrum News spoke to local police chiefs about their concerns with the possibility of marijuana soon being legalized in New York.

Ogden Police Chief Chris Mears and Brighton Police Chief David Catholdi both say traffic enforcement is the biggest challenge, stopping people from driving under the influence.

There is currently no rapid test to find out if someone is under the influence of marijuana besides a blood test.

Both chiefs say some officers are trained in drug recognition, but the training is extensive and more will be needed to keep the roads safe.

Chief Mears cited an increase in traffic fatalities involving marijuana in Colorado after it was legalized there.

“Generally I think it’s going to come down to traffic enforcement and just the quality of life calls,” said Mears. “Trying to come up with some way, immediately to deal with a potential spike in issues.”

“Just because something’s legal, doesn’t mean it’s good for you,” said Catholdi. “You only have to look as far as cigarette smoking. We know that you can smoke cigarettes when you’re an adult, doesn’t mean that it’s good for you. So I think I would take that same approach with marijuana. But we’ll see what the legislation looks like, we’ll see what funding streams are available for enforcement, and we’ll do our best to abide by the law.”

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Spectrum News spoke to local police chiefs about their concerns with the possibility of marijuana soon being legalized in New York.

Ogden Police Chief Chris Mears and Brighton Police Chief David Catholdi both say traffic enforcement is the biggest challenge, stopping people from driving under the influence.

There is currently no rapid test to find out if someone is under the influence of marijuana besides a blood test.

Both chiefs say some officers are trained in drug recognition, but the training is extensive and more will be needed to keep the roads safe.

Chief Mears cited an increase in traffic fatalities involving marijuana in Colorado after it was legalized there.

“Generally I think it’s going to come down to traffic enforcement and just the quality of life calls,” said Mears. “Trying to come up with some way, immediately to deal with a potential spike in issues.”

“Just because something’s legal, doesn’t mean it’s good for you,” said Catholdi. “You only have to look as far as cigarette smoking. We know that you can smoke cigarettes when you’re an adult, doesn’t mean that it’s good for you. So I think I would take that same approach with marijuana. But we’ll see what the legislation looks like, we’ll see what funding streams are available for enforcement, and we’ll do our best to abide by the law.”



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