Marijuana commission shouldn’t have granted cultivator ownership change, lawsuit arguesPosted by On


The state Medical Marijuana Commission erred when it allowed a Newport cultivator to change ownership and move the facility to Pine Bluff, according to a lawsuit filed Monday by Little Rock attorney David Couch.

In the lawsuit, Newport Mayor David Stewart and three other plaintiffs argue that the commission did not provide proper notice that a change of ownership and location would be considered at its meeting. The lawsuit also argues that the new owners, Good Day Farm, LLC, were not a registered entity with the state at the time the license was awarded. The suit was filed in Jackson County Circuit Court.

The plaintiffs, which include the Northeast Arkansas Charitable Foundation, also argue that the foundation is owed $2 million as part of the sale. An arrangement with the previous owner, Natural State Wellness Enterprises, LLC, required the owner to provide 10% of the business’ profits to the foundation, which would disburse the funds to nonprofit organizations in Jackson County. Couch said by phone on Tuesday that he believes the foundation is owed 10% of the sale as well as 10% of Good Day Farm’s profits in perpetuity because the agreement with the foundation should be attached to the license.

The plaintiffs argue that the commission has the authority to change its decision to award the license and allow the transfer. The attorney for the commission has stated in a commission meeting that is not possible, according to spokesman Scott Hardin.

“This was just not…

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The state Medical Marijuana Commission erred when it allowed a Newport cultivator to change ownership and move the facility to Pine Bluff, according to a lawsuit filed Monday by Little Rock attorney David Couch.

In the lawsuit, Newport Mayor David Stewart and three other plaintiffs argue that the commission did not provide proper notice that a change of ownership and location would be considered at its meeting. The lawsuit also argues that the new owners, Good Day Farm, LLC, were not a registered entity with the state at the time the license was awarded. The suit was filed in Jackson County Circuit Court.

The plaintiffs, which include the Northeast Arkansas Charitable Foundation, also argue that the foundation is owed $2 million as part of the sale. An arrangement with the previous owner, Natural State Wellness Enterprises, LLC, required the owner to provide 10% of the business’ profits to the foundation, which would disburse the funds to nonprofit organizations in Jackson County. Couch said by phone on Tuesday that he believes the foundation is owed 10% of the sale as well as 10% of Good Day Farm’s profits in perpetuity because the agreement with the foundation should be attached to the license.

The plaintiffs argue that the commission has the authority to change its decision to award the license and allow the transfer. The attorney for the commission has stated in a commission meeting that is not possible, according to spokesman Scott Hardin.

“This was just not…



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