Marijuana legalization not enough, religious groups demand reparationsPosted by On


Rev. Charles Boyer is the pastor at Bethel A.M.E. Church in Trenton who until earlier this month had led its Woodbury, New Jersey congregation. Rev. Boyer is also the founder of Salvation and Social Justice, a non-partisan Black faith-rooted organization that believes liberation should precede legislation and prophetic vision should precede public policy.

Nafeesha Goldsmith remembers her mom as a survivor, always providing for her and her younger sister on her meager paycheck from working at a dry cleaner.

She also sold marijuana on the side to make up the difference. 

“Back in 1990 my mother used to sell a little bit of marijuana just to make ends meet. My mother worked in the dry cleaners her whole life. You know she was a single mom and so it was myself and my younger sister,” said Goldsmith, a Camden County resident. “That’s the thing about my mother, my mother is a survivor; she’s not just going to sit around and let anything get her down.”

However, Goldsmith remembers the day police raided her house. 

“Before my Nana could even react they had the battering ram and knocked the door in and we were in the kitchen so my little sister and I are in shock because we’re like, ‘Whoa, what’s happening?'” recalled Goldsmith. “They’re screaming and they’re yelling, they’ve got guns pointed at us. They started telling us that if we didn’t tell them where our mother was that they were going to send us away to DYFS, so now we’re really scared. It was very traumatic.” 

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Rev. Charles Boyer is the pastor at Bethel A.M.E. Church in Trenton who until earlier this month had led its Woodbury, New Jersey congregation. Rev. Boyer is also the founder of Salvation and Social Justice, a non-partisan Black faith-rooted organization that believes liberation should precede legislation and prophetic vision should precede public policy.

Nafeesha Goldsmith remembers her mom as a survivor, always providing for her and her younger sister on her meager paycheck from working at a dry cleaner.

She also sold marijuana on the side to make up the difference. 

“Back in 1990 my mother used to sell a little bit of marijuana just to make ends meet. My mother worked in the dry cleaners her whole life. You know she was a single mom and so it was myself and my younger sister,” said Goldsmith, a Camden County resident. “That’s the thing about my mother, my mother is a survivor; she’s not just going to sit around and let anything get her down.”

However, Goldsmith remembers the day police raided her house. 

“Before my Nana could even react they had the battering ram and knocked the door in and we were in the kitchen so my little sister and I are in shock because we’re like, ‘Whoa, what’s happening?'” recalled Goldsmith. “They’re screaming and they’re yelling, they’ve got guns pointed at us. They started telling us that if we didn’t tell them where our mother was that they were going to send us away to DYFS, so now we’re really scared. It was very traumatic.” 



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