Regulators begin revoking permits on Missouri marijuana companies that didn’t open on timePosted by On


Botannis Labs once planned to operate a medical marijuana testing lab at 215 N. Grant Ave. near Mother's Brewing Company and Bud's Tire & Wheel off Historic Route 66 in downtown Springfield. But Botannis's state-issued license was revoked March 2, 2021.

Missouri health authorities recently began revoking a handful of medical marijuana business permits after most of the state’s would-be cannabis companies weren’t ready to open for business roughly a year after winning the licenses, which would allow them to grow and sell the plant for lawful patients provided they met their “commencement” deadlines.

Many of Missouri’s cannabis companies got extensions on their operating deadline, the News-Leader reported last month. A trade association representative said most companies cited problems stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic and the inevitable hurdles involved in raising capital for an industry that’s mostly prohibited from using the regular banking system due to marijuana’s federal status as a controlled substance.

But not every company got an extension, and getting one doesn’t mean Missouri companies have all the time they want to get their marijuana businesses through “commencement inspection” and ready to open up, officials with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services told the News-Leader late Monday night. 

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Botannis Labs once planned to operate a medical marijuana testing lab at 215 N. Grant Ave. near Mother's Brewing Company and Bud's Tire & Wheel off Historic Route 66 in downtown Springfield. But Botannis's state-issued license was revoked March 2, 2021.

Missouri health authorities recently began revoking a handful of medical marijuana business permits after most of the state’s would-be cannabis companies weren’t ready to open for business roughly a year after winning the licenses, which would allow them to grow and sell the plant for lawful patients provided they met their “commencement” deadlines.

Many of Missouri’s cannabis companies got extensions on their operating deadline, the News-Leader reported last month. A trade association representative said most companies cited problems stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic and the inevitable hurdles involved in raising capital for an industry that’s mostly prohibited from using the regular banking system due to marijuana’s federal status as a controlled substance.

But not every company got an extension, and getting one doesn’t mean Missouri companies have all the time they want to get their marijuana businesses through “commencement inspection” and ready to open up, officials with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services told the News-Leader late Monday night. 



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