WSU Researchers Explore The Effects Of Cannabis On MemoryPosted by On


You’ve probably heard the anecdotal evidence for years from sources as varied as school anti-drug programs to Cheech and Chong. Now, a WSU study seems to confirm what we have heard about cannabis use and memory issues.

Before the study could even get underway, WSU researchers had to overcome one roadblock from the federal government, to make sure the study reflected the strength of the marijuana products available today. That’s because federal rules regarding cannabis research require that the marijuana used in any studies come from one source.

But that marijuana, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, is not nearly as potent as the pot currently for sale in Washington state dispensaries, with a level of just 6-10% of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.



“In contrast, of course, in the dispensaries they’re selling products that the flower exceeds 20 percent THC, and cannabis concentrates that can exceed 90 percent THC,” says WSU College of Medicine researcher Carrie Cuttler.

She came up with a unique way to do the study. Using the popular Zoom app, Cuttler enlisted 80 volunteers to use cannabis they had purchased on their own legally from state outlets. Then, from the privacy of their own homes, subjects got high, and answered a battery of questions from researchers.

They were divided into a control group that didn’t use cannabis, two groups that used cannabis flower with more…

Original Author Link click here to read complete story..

You’ve probably heard the anecdotal evidence for years from sources as varied as school anti-drug programs to Cheech and Chong. Now, a WSU study seems to confirm what we have heard about cannabis use and memory issues.

Before the study could even get underway, WSU researchers had to overcome one roadblock from the federal government, to make sure the study reflected the strength of the marijuana products available today. That’s because federal rules regarding cannabis research require that the marijuana used in any studies come from one source.

But that marijuana, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, is not nearly as potent as the pot currently for sale in Washington state dispensaries, with a level of just 6-10% of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.



“In contrast, of course, in the dispensaries they’re selling products that the flower exceeds 20 percent THC, and cannabis concentrates that can exceed 90 percent THC,” says WSU College of Medicine researcher Carrie Cuttler.

She came up with a unique way to do the study. Using the popular Zoom app, Cuttler enlisted 80 volunteers to use cannabis they had purchased on their own legally from state outlets. Then, from the privacy of their own homes, subjects got high, and answered a battery of questions from researchers.

They were divided into a control group that didn’t use cannabis, two groups that used cannabis flower with more…



Source link

News

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.